New hearing test may show damage loud music can do

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Is modern life making YOU deaf? New test may show damage loud music can do to your hearing

  • About one in six adults in the UK has some degree of hearing loss and it is not clear if listening to loud music plays a role
  • UK researchers are now asking the public to take an online hearing test and describe how they listen to music

British scientists are asking the public to participate in an online hearing test to determine if modern life is damaging our ears.

About one in six adults in the UK suffers from some hearing loss and it is not clear whether listening to loud music plays a significant role.

Scientists are particularly interested in whether people’s listening backgrounds affect the way they hear the present.

About one in six adults in the UK suffers from hearing loss and it is not clear whether listening to loud music plays a role. To find out if people of all ages are subjecting their ears to too much noise, the MRC launched a mass participation study

The number of UK adults who have difficulty hearing in social situations with background noise has increased by 12% over the past two decades and is expected to rise further, according to figures published in the International Journal of Audiology.

According to the World Health Organization, the leading cause of preventable hearing loss is loud noise, such as that from heavy industry in the workplace and loud music.

Researchers at the Medical Research Council and the National Institute of Health Research wonder if nearly a century of amplified music has anything to do with the prevalence of hearing difficulties.

To find out, a mass participation study was designed for all age groups and asks people to share information about their listening habits as well as test their speech hearing against background noise.

The study asks how often you go to concerts and nightclubs, as well as how often you have used personal music players, such as personal music players, Diskmans, and MP3 players, over different periods of time.

It also asks more specific questions, such as “How often today does a hearing difficulty limit what you do socially or personally? “

The experience is available here.

The number of UK adults who have difficulty hearing in social situations with background noise has increased by 12% over the past two decades and is expected to rise further, according to figures published in the International Journal of Audiology.

The number of UK adults who have difficulty hearing in social situations with background noise has increased by 12% over the past two decades and is expected to rise further, according to figures published in the International Journal of Audiology.

If a lifetime of loud concerts and high-volume stereos leads to hearing loss, scientists expect to see a correlation between past listening habits reported by attendees and current hearing abilities.

Dr Michael Akeroyd, from the MRC Institute of Hearing Research, who is leading the project, said: “Many studies of music-related hearing loss have focused on musicians who may be exposed to loud music almost every day. days.

“But much less is known about the cumulative effects of listening to loud music on the hearing of the general public. The main objective of this project is to determine if there is such a link.

According to the World Health Organization, the leading cause of preventable hearing loss is loud noise, such as that from heavy industry in the workplace, as well as loud music at concerts and personal music devices.

According to the World Health Organization, the leading cause of preventable hearing loss is loud noise, such as that from heavy industry in the workplace, as well as loud music at concerts and personal music devices.

The study asks how often you go to concerts and nightclubs, as well as how often you use personal music players, such as personal music players, Diskmans, and MP3 players, over different time periods, as well as more questions. specific to hearing.

The study asks how often you go to concerts and nightclubs, as well as how often you use personal music players, such as personal music players, Diskmans, and MP3 players, over different time periods, as well as more questions. specific to hearing.

Over the past 100 years, advances in electronic amplification have transformed the way people listen to music, from horn gramophones in 1923 to extremely loud speakers at concerts and nightclubs to personal stereos and now to music. MP3 players.

Action on Hearing Loss has long campaigned on the dangers of loud music and the importance of protecting and preserving hearing.

Paul Breckell, CEO of the charity, said: “The damage to your hearing is irreversible and contrary to popular opinion, hearing loss is not a condition that only older people need to worry about.

“With many nightclubs and concerts measuring 20 or 30 decibels above the safe noise level, more and more young people are likely to begin to feel the effects of their music and concert habits.

“Hearing loss not only precludes our enjoyment of music, but has the potential to lead to unemployment, isolation and has even been linked to dementia.”

Over the past 100 years, advances in electronic amplification have transformed the way people listen to music, from horn gramophones in 1923 to concert and nightclub speakers to personal stereos and now to MP3 players.

Over the past 100 years, advances in electronic amplification have transformed the way people listen to music, from horn gramophones in 1923 to concert and nightclub speakers to personal stereos and now MP3 players.


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